Tag Archives: Nepal

Letter from the Founder

Dear all,

Since the earthquake six days ago our Nepali friends from Access Health Care have been doing all they can to assist the re-establishment of Nepal.

AHC consists of folks much like myself; we are a group of young and dynamic students and professionals in the fields of medicine, nursing, public health and engineering.
The task we are facing is not an easy one and the post-earthquake situation is complicated. Things ares chaotic and as we are working in the field we find many controversies about what should be done and how it should be done. 

We do not say that we know the golden solution to the issues that are currently arising and we know that efforts must be diverse and many. However, I can guarantee that our friends are doing all in their power to help. We have a plan, and as we proceed we will adjust to the reality that we meet to the best of our ability.

We have created this site to update you all about our work and we highly appreciate you all following, sharing and creating awareness about the present situation in Nepal.

For those of you who wish to help, donations to our work are can be given through www.acchealthcare.org. All the funding we receive is spent exclusively for the emergency response and the long-term purpose of AHC.

Sincerely,
David Kovacs
Founder, AHC.

Post Earthquake Situation in Rural Nepal is Getting Worse

SINDUPALCHOWK, NEPAL

After providing shelter for victims of the earthquake in Kathmandu, our team is now moving towards areas outside the valley.

According to the official numbers from the Government of Nepal, 2071 people have lost their lives in the district of Sindhupalchowk and more than 648 people have suffered from injuries due to the devastating earthquake that has recently occurred in Nepal.

We currently have 10 volunteers that are working hard to assist the people in Sindhupalchowk. The aim of our team is to provide the basic needs of the people in this district which will be adequate for the next month or a month and a half. We also aim to provide medical support. Some of the basic needs at the moment includes food, tents, blankets or quilts (if tents won’t be available green house plastics, thermal plastics), mats or profiles, medications, sanitations and cloths.

Based on the first number of donations from Denmark, the team has bought bagged foods (as shown in the images below), as the risk of Hepatitis and Cholera are high in local stored food.

The current situation is worsening and the safety in Sindhupalchowk  is compromised. Many people are still missing their relatives and friends.

You can now help AHC with the necessary support on our front page in order to aid the people in need in Nepal. The ressources will be transferred directly to our team of volunteers that is currently active in Sindhupalchowk.

Support Our Earthquake Efforts

We currently have 10 healthcare workers and volunteers that are working hard to assist the people in Sindhupalchowk. The aim of our team is to provide the basic needs of the people in this district which will be adequate for the next month or a month and a half. We also aim to provide medical support. Some of the basic needs at the moment includes food, tents, blankets or quilts (if tents won’t be available green house plastics, thermal plastics), mats or profiles, medications, sanitations and cloths.

Support our team’s efforts using the paypal donation function below. The money will be transferred directly to the official Access Health Account in Denmark and will then be transferred directly to the AHC-workers in Nepal!

AHCN #10 – Bhattechaur and Sisne Views

After a 14 hour walk we had finally arrived in Bhattechaur, the furthest village we would reach.

Before we would proceed to conduct our first health camp in the village, we went to an incredible view point from which we could see the Southern end of the Dhaulagiri mountain range, namely Sisne peak of 5911 metres, the highest point of Rukum.

This gallery contains photos of mountain side villages, the people of Bhattechaur and the mountain views. The gallery is one of my favourites; it really shows the true beauty of Nepal.

AHCN #9 – 14 hours Incredible Walk

After reaching Rukum on impossible roads, meeting with the Local Development Officer, visiting the Salle Bajjar/Musikot District Hospital where we experienced the harsh reality for the patients of Rukum, buying medication and receiving donations at the Chitwan Medical College Teaching Hospital we were finally ready to start are trek towards Sisne. On our trip this far we had seen amazing sceneries, however the best was still to come, as you can see in the gallery below.

One of our initial goals with AHCN was to reach an area that was as rural as possible, where we would document the health care situation. Rukum is not a frequently visited are by tourists and in effect it was virtually impossible to find out how long it would take to reach a given village prior to our departure. Due to a limited budget we only had one day to walk and we wanted to reach all the way to Sisne. While we did not manage to reach Sisne village it self (at the foot of Sisne peak), we did reach the village of Bhattechaur, which is located in the Sisne Village Development Committee region.

We suspected on the way, that we would have a long walk ahead of us. The locals had told that Bhattechaur took a full day to reach. We quickly found out however, that a distance which would take a local a day too reach may very well take two days for a city folks. Finally we ended up walking 14 hours to reach our goal before we, with soar feet and aching legs, reached Bhattechaur and had the best portion of traditional Nepali food in our lives.

The Harsh Reality for the People of Rural Nepal

The featured image above is a labour bed. This is where mothers of the region give birth – if they go to the hospital at all.

At Access Health Care Nepal we believe that health care is a human right: Everyone has the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, which includes access to all medical services, sanitation, adequate food, decent housing, healthy working conditions, and a clean environment.

After seeing the current state of the Salle Bajjar District Hospital however, we had to conclude, that if one of us was a patient in this region, we would avoid all contact with its health care system if possible at all. Looking through this gallery speaks for it self. You don’t have to ask yourself whether or not you would like to be admitted here to know the answer. This is the largest public hospital in Rukum and the condition of it is devastating for the people.

After an initial meeting with the doctors of the hospital we were given a tour of the hospital. A quick inventory (made during the tour) showed that more than 66% of the equipment is out of order – and we were not counting the piles of broken equipment in the storeroom as the storekeeper was on leave.

The hospital has 15 beds and an occupancy rate at all time of at least 150% – and 200-300% is not uncommon. The hospital has no biomedical engineering staff and in consequence they have no preventive maintenance program. If something breaks, a request for new equipment is made to the government. Whether the request is met or not is completely unpredictable.

During the Maoist insurgency Doctors Without Borders were active in the region and the hospital was quite well off. However, since activity of the Maoists came to an end around 2011, the activity of Doctors Without Borders did the same, and today the hospital has become completely neglected.

At a hospital like Salle Bajjar District Hospital, the presence of Access Health Care Nepal as well as Engineering World Health would not only be helpful, but would be a part of fulfilling every individual’s fundamental human right to health care.

A central aim of for Access Health Care Nepal is to create awareness of the health care circumstances in rural Nepal. You can help us by sharing this article.

AHCN #8 – Meeting with the Local Development Officer of Rukum

Before proceeding to Rukumkot, we had a meeting with Mr. Bharat Sharma, the Local Development Officer of Rukum, to talk about the health care needs of the district, and about and how AHCN and possibly also EWH could help the region. We agreed with Mr. Bharat Sharma to arrange a visit to the Salle Bajjar District Hospital that very same day (post about the visit coming up tomorrow). Furthermore Mr. Bharat Sharma ensured that it would be possible to bring EWH volunteers to the region and we agreed to collaborate in phase 2 and 3 of the AHCN effort in Rukum.

AHCN #7 Musikot

Musikot (in the same area as Jumlikhalanga and Salle Bajjar) is the administrative centre of Rukum. Dr. Justin of our team lived here while still a child, before moving to Kathmandu. During our visit we stayed at their beautiful traditional Nepali house, where Justins grandmother still lives.

During our stay we also met Mr. Chandra Bahadur Malla, a teacher from Rukumkot, who would be our guide on the way to Sisne and back the following 3 days.

AHCN # 6 Reaching Rukum on Impossible Roads.

On the third day of our trip we would emerge from the flat Terai region in south into the mountains and on the fourth we would have to drive on roads so poor, that it took us 8 hours to drive 35 kilometres.

At times the road would be too narrow for two vehicles and either one or the other would have to back up several hundred meters to find a spot with sufficient room to pass. Seeing people sitting on the top of busses and jeeps in this setting plainly seemed extremely dangerous.

Mountain side terrace-farms were everywhere on the way. We came across numerous small villages and we met many local people. We came across some view points as well and several times Sisne, the tallest peak in Rukum of 5916 metres, would reveal it self in the north. At one of the viewpoints we were lucky to catch an absolutely beautiful sunset over the peak.

We reached Rukumkot, the last location in Rukum that can be reached by car, in the dark at about 9 pm. We received a warm welcome in the village where we stayed with relatives of Dr. Justin Jung Malla.